Entries in Kitchens (5)

Thursday
Jan282016

Your Kitchen Countertop Doesn’t Have to Look So Sad — Here Are 6 DIY Solutions

You don’t have to live with ugly. Give your countertops a beauty makeover with some simple DIY love.

Can’t figure out why your kitchen appears outdated? Look down. It could be your countertop, the centerpiece of your kitchen and a key focal point of your entire home.

Ugly Countertop Syndrome may be common, but it’s far from incurable. You may be salivating over white granite while bemoaning your finances, but the solution doesn’t have to be that expensive — or that difficult to install.

From paint to wood, concrete paper to (gasp!) laminate, your kitchen countertop options are endless with a little DIY, even on a tiny budget. All you have to do is decide which solution is right for you. Here are six ideas to get you started.

1.  Modern Laminate

Project time: 2 to 3 days

Cost: From $30 per sheet

Durability: 10 to 20 years, with proper care

Forget what you think you know about laminate. Manufacturers have begun creating countertops that mimic high-end granite styles. “You can’t tell the difference until you touch it,” says Meredith Barclay, a countertops merchant for Home Depot.

Try Formica, which makes several elegant granite-esque patterns that cost around $90 for a 96-inch-long sheet, giving you the look of Calacatta marble for much, much less. Or try Wilsonart’s textured, glossy sheets — perfect for creating your dream all-white kitchen without breaking the bank.

Or, try something bold — like the glossy red kitchen countertops Cincinnati homeowner Suzanne Prince Quinn and her husband installed.

“It was bright-looking and sleek,” Quinn says. “We wanted to have an uncluttered kitchen.”

Red laminate countertop in kitchenImage: Suzanne Quinn

If you’re going to install laminate yourself, don’t be afraid to consult with experts. Barclay bemoans customers who think their special-order laminate countertop was made incorrectly. “But the customer really didn’t know how to install the product that we delivered to them,” she says.

For the most part, Quinn found the process simple. “It was quite easy to work with,” she says. Ten years after installation, the only durability issue is that the countertops have risen slightly around the seams, a problem caused by moisture build-up.

Common installation pitfalls include making sure the laminate fits perfectly against uneven surfaces, such as textured, tiled, or brick walls. It’s not a difficult process (all you really need is a compass and a pencil), but done incorrectly, it can look unprofessional.

For Quinn, laminate countertops have another benefit: Instead of being committed to granite or quartz for decades, she can change up her kitchen on a whim.

“If we’d spent a ton of money on granite or anything else, we would feel like we probably shouldn’t change it,” Quinn says. “This way, we get to make changes when we’d like to.”

2.  Concrete

Project time: About a week

Cost: $300 to $500

Durability: Long-lasting, but stains easily

Concrete countertops are back in style — Pinterest is rife with tutorials for transforming your home into industrial chic. But owners are divided on the trend’s longevity, not to mention the upkeep. A survey on “The Kitchn” yielded responses ranging from “I do kind of hate them” to complaints about maintenance to “I would do it again in a heartbeat.”

So are they for you? Here’s what to expect with concrete: a dusty, messy process that takes about a week. Hiring a pro is recommended, but if you’re feeling handy, it’s a totally manageable DIY.

“Initially, it sounds a little overwhelming, but when you break it down to the original steps, there’s nothing there that’s hard to do,” says Jenise Frohlinger, the blogger behind “Do It Yourself Fun Ideas.”

Frohlinger opted for a marbleized concrete, traveling to Las Vegas to learn the Ashby technique. She attended a course through Countertop Solutions. Although she recommends the course for anyone who wants to learn the nitty-gritty of countertop creation, Frohlinger says anyone can do this project, even without a class. Here’s the counter she made in the course:

Jenise built this counter in a classImage: Jenise @ DIYFunIdeas.com

Frohlinger’s advice for first-timers: Make sure your measurements are accurate, especially when cutting your countertop template out of melamine or plywood. And when you pour the concrete, do it in one shot, she says. “You want to make sure you’re consistent in the color.”

3.  Granite Tiles

Project time: A (long) weekend 

Cost: From $7 per square foot

Durability: The same as granite — indefinitely — but with the annoyance of dirty or cracking grout

Want the granite look for less? Swap out the enormous slab for smaller tiles — a project Barclay calls a viable DIY project for homeowners.

It’s much cheaper, too. Although tiles can be purchased for as little as $7 per square foot, a slab countertop costs upwards of $60 per square foot.

Granite also weighs nearly 13 pounds per square foot, meaning a five-foot-long slab countertop might weigh up to 130 pounds — or more, if you’re using thicker materials. Choose granite tiles instead, and you’re looking at only 13 pounds per 12-inch tile. That’s heavy, but not crazy heavy.

You’ll need a wet saw to cut the tiles to fit, but installation is the same as any other tiling project. Spread thin-set mortar on your surface, use spacers to separate the tiles, and grout in between.

But if you choose to go this route, Barclay has one warning: keeping the grout clean can be a pain “due to the variety of materials that come in contact with a countertop,” she says. Regular maintenance will be required, and you’ll want to clean spills and messes immediately.

4.  Contact Paper

Project time: An afternoon

Cost: Less than $100

Durability: Definitely not a long-term solution.

Although Barclay doesn’t recommend this as a long-term solution, covering your countertops in contact paper can be a fantastic, low-cost alternative to a full remodel.

Depending on the size of your kitchen, contact paper can cost less than $100 and provide a dramatic transformation. We tried it ourselves and the upgrade looked “100% better,” according to HouseLogic writer Lisa Kaplan Gordon.

Countertop resurfaced with Contact PaperImage: Lisa Kaplan Gordon for HouseLogic 

Installation requires a steady hand — you’ll need to be careful to avoid bubbles — but shouldn’t take more than a few hours to dramatically change your kitchen’s look.

Although some remodelers report it lasting for years, don’t forget the battle wounds your countertop might endure. Anything from hot pots to a dropped knife can wreck the paper.

But even if it doesn’t last long, it’s easy to redo when disaster strikes. As long as you consider it a temporary stand-in between remodels, your new countertops are unlikely to disappoint.

5.  Paint

Project time: A little less than a week

Cost: $100 to $200

Durability: Paint will hold up well, but won’t last forever.

Looking for another easy upgrade, but want a solution that’s a little more permanent? Try paint.

Blogger Dawn Sailors of “Designing Dawn” bought a home on short sale that needed “a lot of cosmetic upgrades,” she says — particularly in the kitchen, which had cracked, yellow-speckled laminate tops.

Before kitchen counter was paintedImage: “Designing Dawn” 

“I just couldn’t live with what was there forever, but we didn’t have unlimited funds to update everything,” Sailors says. Inspired by an idea she’d found online, she decided to paint the countertops, using neutral, light colors like white and gray — and adding a little glitter to the mix for depth. 

Because paint is permanent, take care during application. Sailors mixed in accent colors to give her countertops a subtle, marbleized effect and sealed the entire thing with EnviroTex Lite for a glossy finish and to ensure food safety.

Kitchen counter updated with paintImage: “Designing Dawn”

The entire project cost Sailors just $120 and put her kitchen out of commission for a little less than a week — two days of work and three days spent hardening. And even though they weren’t meant to last forever, they’ve held up well.

“The countertops were meant in the beginning to be a stopgap until we could afford real stone counters,” she says. “But they’ve held up so well, we still haven’t replaced them four years later.”

6.  Wood Overlay

Project time: About a week

Cost: $200

Durability: With maintenance, it should last years — as long as you’re OK with dings and scratches.

Butcher block countertops are nearly as popular as granite. And while professional installation costs far less, it’s still out of budget for many homeowners.

You can certainly pick up premade butcher block countertops from Ikea for $189 per 98-inch slab, but Erica Hebel from “On Bliss Street” decided to make her own using aspen boards from her local hardware store, which cost about $45 for a 72-inch panel. She paid less than $200 for the entire project.

This is what Hebel’s counters looked like before:

Before home kitchen counter upgradedImage: Erica Hebel of “OnBlissStreet.com” 

The bulk of the construction is prepping, staining, and nailing the boards to your cabinetry — nothing too complicated. Cover it up with a sealant (Hebel used Minwax Wipe-On Poly in a clear finish) to protect your countertops from drips.

“It was one of my very first projects ever,” Hebel says. “The wood’s very forgiving. As long as you have a tape measure, you can figure it out.”

After countertop resurfaced with woodImage: Erica Hebel of “OnBlissStreet.com”

Although the countertops aren’t quite as low-maintenance as stone, Hebel says they’ve held up “amazingly well” in the year since installation — except for a few dents from dropped dishes, which “don’t affect the finish at all.” No, you shouldn’t cut directly on the surface or put hot pots on them, but under normal usage, they’ll last a long time.

jamie-wiebe Jamie Wiebe

Jamie Wiebe is a writer and editor with a focus on home improvement and design. Previously, she worked as a web editor for “House Beautiful,” “ELLE Decor,” and “Veranda.”



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Monday
Jul202015

How to Handle Your 'Open Concept' House

When your kitchen opens to your living room, you can't really use opposing décor in each space. Your entire home needs to flow. Here are some tricks to creating a space that is both cozy and functional.

  • Choose coordinated color palates: Decorating your kitchen in bold primary colors while keeping an autumn palate in your open living room will be torture for the eye. It is critical that you choose colors for each of these spaces that coordinate with one another. Choose one color to tie everything together and coordinating shades to blend the rooms together.
  • Create rooms within rooms: Not everyone loves large, open floor plans and sometimes it is important to create visual breaks. Use design tricks to create rooms within rooms. Use a rug, a love seat and two chairs to form a conversation area in one corner of the large space. Set your primary sofa with the back to the center of the room to break up the space and create a walking path.
  • Match your lighting: If you have a large crystal chandelier over your dining room table but your living room has a series of modern lamps, this can be confusing. Do what you can to create symmetry in lighting throughout the open space. Match the colors or the design aesthetics of lamps and light fixtures to tie the entire area together.
  • Add personality with accessories: Of course, you don't have to have one design concept for the entire house. You can use accessories to personalize each space. Maybe you would love to have owls in your kitchen. This doesn''t mean you have to extend that décor into the living space. Use different accessories around your house to separate the functions. 
Saturday
Jul112015

5 Classy Kitchen Cabinet Updates for Under $100

5 Classy Kitchen Cabinet Updates for Under $100

You don’t have to spend a lot to give your tired cabinets a lift. These five inexpensive cabinet updates will brighten the mood of your entire kitchen.

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1.  Handsome Hardware

Knobs and pulls are kitchen jewelry that can dress cabinets up. Note that cabinet hardware can get very fancy and expensive — costing $30 and up for a single ornate knob. But you’ll get a huge bang for a few bucks by buying 10-packs of simple, contemporary hardware at big box stores for less than $20 (that’s $2 a knob!).

To save time and money, replace 1-hole hardware with 1-hole upgrades; 2-hole with 2-hole. That way, you won’t need to drill or patch.

2.  Pretty in Paint

Nothing updates old cabinets as quickly as fresh coat of paint

Painting cabinets yourself is cost-effective — a few gallons of paint, sandpaper, cleaner — but the process is time-intensive. You can paint most cabinet surfaces, but proper prep is key to success. For laminate and melamine finishes, be sure to rough up the surface with 150-grit sandpaper, and apply a good bonding primer before topping it off with the color of your choice.

If you’re going to dive into this DIY project, keep these tips in mind:

  • Lighter-colored paints will make your kitchen seem bigger.
  • Don’t skip on prep. Thoroughly clean cabinet doors and boxes to remove grease and dried-on gunk; fill holes or nicks with wood putty, then sand.
  • Sand each coat of paint so your final coat will look perfect.
  • Lay doors flat to paint, and wait until each side is completely dry before painting the other side. It will take more time, but you’ll avoid ugly drip marks.

3.  Molding Miracles

Crown molding adds a touch of class to the tops of tired cabinets for less than you’d expect. Three-inch, primed composite crown molding with a dentil design costs as little as $20 for 8 feet. 

It’s easiest to add molding when you’re repainting cabinets; that way you’ll get a perfect match. 

If you order matching wood molding from your cabinet’s manufacturer, be prepared for a color difference between new molding and older cabinets. Natural wood cabinets (especially cherry) will darken with age.

For a look at other crown molding miracles, take a look at this slideshow.

4.  Fancy Glass

Change the glass insert in a cabinet door, and you change the look and feel of your kitchen. 

“Decorative glass takes stock cabinets and gives them a custom look,” says Anthony Longo, who sells glass panels. 

Not all cabinet doors are candidates for a changeover, however. You’ll need the kind of door with a removable panel. Check the backs of your doors to see if the center panel can be taken out.

Types of glass inserts are limitless — contemporary, bubbles, raindrops on water, antique — and cost $7 to $9 per square foot. So, you can change the look of a 2-door, 30-inch-by-24-inch cabinet (about 5 square feet of glass) for between $35 and $45. 

5.  Task Lighting

Once, the only way to shed light on kitchen tasks was by hard-wiring under-cabinet lights — an expensive and messy task. But you can add lighting under and inside cabinets with battery powered, peel-and-stick LED lights.

Of course, battery-run lights are not as bright as their hard-wired cousins. But at about $8 each, you can afford to buy several and scatter them around. LED light bulbs last for thousands of hours of use.




Saturday
Jan172015

When to Repair or Replace Your Appliance

Consider age, repair cost, pricing, energy efficiency, and whether to modify your kitchen to accommodate a new unit.

When an appliance is old and isn’t working efficiently, it’s easy to decide to replace rather than repair the machine — may it rest in peace. 

But appliances often break before their time, making the repair-or-replace decision harder.

If money is tight, you may have to repair the appliance and hope for the best. But if you’ve got some coin, then replacing with a new, energy-efficient model often is the better way to go.

That’s a lot of ifs, and the repair-or-replace dilemma often is hard to resolve. Here are some guidelines that will help you decide.

Is It Really Broken?

When appliances stop working, we get so rattled that the obvious escapes us. Before you panic, make sure:

  • The appliance is plugged in.
  • Circuit breakers haven’t tripped. (I once replaced a blender only to discover that the circuit needed resetting.)
  • Flooring hasn’t become uneven, which can stop some appliances from turning on.
  • Vents and filters aren’t clogged with lint and dust.

Related: How to Help Your Appliances Last Longer

Is It Still Under Warranty?

Check your owner’s manual or records to see if the sick appliance is still under warranty. Most warranties on major appliances cover labor and parts for a year; some extend coverage of parts for two years. If it’s still covered, schedule a service call.

Related: Is an Extended Warranty Right for You?

Is It Truly at the End of Its Useful Life?

Appliances have an average useful life — the typical lifespan after which the machine is running on borrowed time. The closer your appliance is to its hypothetical past due date, the wiser it is to replace, rather than repair.

Here are the typical lifespans of major appliances.

Appliance Average Lifespan (Years)
Compactor 6
Dishwasher 9
Disposal 12
Dryer 13
Exhaust Fan 10
Freezer 11
Microwave 9
Range, electric 13
Range, gas 15
Range/oven hood 14
Refrigerator 13
Washer 10


How to Follow the 50% Rule

In 2014, the average cost to repair an appliance was $254 to $275. Should you pay it?

If an appliance is more than 50% through its lifespan, and if the cost of one repair is more than 50% of the cost of buying new, then you should replace rather than repair.

To do the math, you’ll have to know the typical lifespan (see above), and get a repair estimate. Most service companies charge a “trip charge” to diagnose the problem. These charges vary widely, so be sure to ask when you arrange the appointment.  If the company repairs the appliance, the trip charge typically is waived.

DIY Whenever Possible

If you know your way around a socket wrench, you may be able to make simple appliance repairs yourself and save labor fees. YouTube has lots of DIY repair videos, and user manuals can help you troubleshoot. 

Can’t find your manual? Search online for “manual” along with your appliance brand and model number. Most manufacturers provide free downloadable PDFs of appliance manuals, and there are several online sites that specialize in nothing but manuals.

However, there is a downside to repairing appliances yourself.

  • Many electrical replacement parts are non-refundable, so if you misdiagnose the problem, you’ve wasted money.
  • Large appliances are heavy and bulky. You risk injury if you don’t know how to move, open, and lift the machine property.
  • Some appliance warranties are voided when you mess with the machine yourself.
  • If you forget to unplug the machine before making repairs, you can electrocute yourself (making the money you save a moot point).

How to Calculate Whether Energy Efficiency is Cost Effective

New water-saving and energy-efficient appliances can be cost effective: A modern refrigerator, for instance, uses roughly half the electricity of one built 20 years ago.

But replacing energy clunkers that still have miles left on them may not be a money-wise move. You might spend thousands on an appliance in order to save hundreds (if you’re lucky) on your energy bill.

Jill A. Notini of the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers says if you’re planning on staying in your home for 10 to 15 years, upgrading appliances is a good idea. However, if you’re planning on moving soon, you’ll save money by keeping your older appliances, and letting the new owners upgrade to energy-efficient models.

Are There Hidden Costs When Replacing Old Appliances?

The cost of replacing an appliance may include more than just the price of the machine. In fact, the price tag could be the least of the money you’ll spend to upgrade an appliance.

  • A new refrigerator may not fit in the old spot. You could have to modify cabinetry to fit the new appliance (be sure to measure accurately).
  • Gas ovens and ranges will save money only if your home already has gas connections. If not, you could spend thousands bringing a gas line into your home or hundreds rerouting the lines you already have.
  • Upgrading from a simple gas range to one with all the bells and whistles may require upgrading or adding electrical wiring and circuits.



Read more:  http://www.houselogic.com/home-advice/appliances/when-to-repair-or-replace-large-appliances/#ixzz3P65v2czl 
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Wednesday
May142014

Ways to Make the Kitchen Sizzle

A Dozen Ways to Make Kitchens Sizzle

Whether they’re getting their house ready for the market or creating a dream kitchen in a home they just bought, clients considering a major kitchen redo will need guidance. Here are 12 tips and trends to help you serve as their resource.
 

Home buyers and sellers planning a kitchen redo have a lot of questions they need answered: What style of cabinets are in? What’s the newest color for countertops? What appliances should I install when there are so many? How do I ensure that mykitchen will be a gathering hub?

The cost of redoing a kitchen is on the rise, averaging $109,000 for an upscale renovation and $55,000 for a mid-range transformation, according to the 2014 Cost vs. Value Report. You can serve as a much-needed resource for clients, advising them on the dos and don’ts when considering a kitchen remodel and helping them identify improvements within their budget.

We asked some favorite kitchen pundits, including John Petrie, president of the National Kitchen & Bath Association and his firm, Mother Hubbard’s Custom Cabinetry in Mechanicsburg, Pa., about everything from paint to hardware to snazzy light fixtures.

Experts say the following dozen trends are generating the hottest buzz in kitchens this year:

1. Safety first. No matter how stunning a kitchen looks or how well it functions, it won’t make one iota of difference if fire occurs. Cooking is the leading cause of home fires, according to the National Fire Protection Association. Home owners have multiple ways to guarantee safety, such as paying full attention when cooking, knowing to smother a flame with a lid if a fire starts, and knowing how to operate a fire extinguisher properly.

When considering a kitchen renovation, clients should consider additional safety systems, such asGuardian Safety Solutions International Inc.’s fire suppression system that turns off a range to prevent reignition.

Design choices can also help curb accidents, such as ovens placed within easy reach of all family members, tactile floors to avoid falls, and good illumination.

2. Cleaner, contemporary lines. Styles fade in and out, typically following suit with fashion trends and the economy. This year, home owners are gravitating away from traditional and even eclectic designs, instead opting for streamlined, modern looks, says Petrie. This preference is showing up in less-ornamented cabinet fronts, sometimes with a flat door or minimal molding and simpler hardware. Trends also include less exotic countertop patterns, simpler floor choices such as wood planks or bigger tiles with less grout, and pared-back color palettes.

If your clients prefer some texture, materials like brick warm up a space with a handcrafted look. Try applying it to novel areas — how about on the ceiling? 

3. Open wide. Whether it’s small or large, a kitchen that opens to other rooms — including the outdoors — offers space to cook. Clients could consider the different zones of a kitchen, such as eating and living space, says designer Jeff Collé of Estates by Collé in East Hampton, N.Y. His upscale remodeled kitchens often feature fireplaces, TVs, sound systems, and butler’s pantries — they’re now referred to as “caterer’s kitchens” since they include space and equipment to cook and clean up.

4. White still tops. While white continues to maintain its front-runner status because of its classic chic connotation, gray has increased in popularity, showing up in stained and painted cabinets and countertops fabricated from quartz, quartzite, limestone, granite, and marble with lots of gray veining. If home owners are making choices for a kitchen where they’ll live for years, opting for gray makes sense, but if they’re making improvements to sell, it may be smarter to stay with more buyers’ preference for white. Despite conventional wisdom, some pops of color can liven up a kitchen. 

5. Wood neck-to-neck with porcelain tile. These two choices command the greatest attention for flooring. Both are easy on feet and highly durable, and many porcelain tiles mimic wood so well they’re hard to differentiate. For those who favor wood, narrower widths are in again — 2 to 3 inches typically fit contemporary taste; for those who prefer porcelain, bigger tiles — 12 by 24 inches — are making inroads.

6. Quartz is the new granite. Because of its ubiquity, due in part to so many imports and lower prices, granite has lost star power. What’s taking its place is quartz, which is similar to quartzite; it’s easier to maintain and affordable (though not always as inexpensive as the least expensive granite), and it offers a less-fussy patterned appearance to suit contemporary styles. For home owners who still love marble for its old-fashioned cachet yet fear its porosity and stainability, there are quartzes that are difficult to differentiate, particularly from white Carrera marble.

7. Induction, steam ovens, microwave drawers, and more.There’s lots happening on the appliance front; some trends have been around but are increasing in popularity, while others are brand new. But a modern layout continues to separate cooking equipment so multiple cooks can work together without getting in each other’s way.

Here are some examples of appliance trends:

  • Microwave drawers that are easier for all generations to reach than those placed above a range or cooktop.
  • Induction cooktops that heat up and cool down faster, saving energy. Their higher prices may deter some, as may their need for higher amps, says Shirley Hood, appliance salesperson and spokesperson for Abt Electronics and Appliances in Glenview, Ill.
  • More powerful gas range burners that offer higher output, even 18,000 BTUs.
  • Steam ovens that cook faster and allow for healthier food preparation, along with a second convection oven; some steam ovens include a cleaning function that permits spills to be removed without heating and smelling up a kitchen for hours, says Hood.
  • French-door style refrigerators that make it easier to view contents when doors are opened, they’re now available from some manufacturers with four doors.
  • Hot-water dispensers on refrigerator doors.
  • Refrigerator drawers, which can be located anyplace in a kitchen or family room for easy access and let family members get to fresh foods without crowding the main work zone.
  • Beverage centers and wine coolers that are placed strategically at points of use.
  • Dishwashers that have three and four racks for silverware and utensils; also, models that use less water, are quieter and bigger, and place jets along side walls.
  • Integrated appliances, better camouflaged behind panels to dress up open-style kitchens.
  • Faucets that conserve water and have touchless controls.
  • Long, deep, one-bowl sinks, sometimes with cutting boards to conserve space.
  • Smaller appliances that fit into smaller condos and homes.
  • Built-in coffee makers fully in view. Everyone wants to be a barista!

8. Drawers beneath countertops rather than doors. Rather than have to go through a two-step process of opening below counter cabinets and reaching into and rummaging through shelves, drawers that pull out and present all their contents are taking hold. The one downside: These shelves aren’t adjustable as are those in many cabinets.

9. Glass splash and more. Backsplashes have become a major focal point; subway tiles are still popular, though now with beveled edges; matte rather than glossy finishes; a variety of colors rather than just classic white; and in larger 4-by-10-inch formats rather than traditional 3-by-6-inch sizes. Today’s trend is also to lay the tiles in vertical rather than horizontal rows. Bigger glass tiles in shimmery hues are grabbing attention, too—and they represent a green choice, made out of recycled materials. Another option is handcrafted tiles with an Art Deco and Frank Lloyd Wright influence.

10. LED lighting. Because it’s been mandated by certain states and the federal government has required that incandescent lamps be phased out unless sufficiently energy efficient, more professionals and home owners are making the switch to energy-wise LEDs underneath cabinets and in cans, pendants, chandeliers, and sconces. Costs have come down for LEDs, and lighting trends lean toward fewer but larger pendants above islands and more decorative fixtures above tables.

11. Look, ma, no desk. Due to the trend of using smaller personal electronic devices—computers, tablets, phones—fewer homeowners need a separate desk. Nowadays, a designated counter with several outlets, sometimes concealed, becomes the go-to charging station replacing a desk.

12. Eating in and cooking out. An eating area is more de rigueur, whether it’s a big table, a corner banquette with a table, or a countertop. And outdoor kitchens, with varying dimensions depending on climate and budgets, remain popular. Many home owners no longer want the full panoply of outdoor appliances, which were often underutilized and overpriced; a good grill sometimes may be sufficient.

Sources: Charles B. Clark Jr., vice president of engineering services at the Brick Industry Association, Reston, Va.; Jeff Collé, Estates by Jeffrey Collé, East Hampton, N.Y.; Dan Hechtkopf and Reid Heidenry, South Beach Investment Realty, Miami Beach, Fla.; Shirley Hood, marketing, ABT Electronics and Appliances, Glenview, Ill.; Claudia Juestel, Adeeni Design Group, San Francisco; John Petrie, president, Mother Hubbard’s Custom Cabinetry, Mechanicsburg, Pa..; Kristin Petro, Kristin Petro Interiors, Elmhurst, Ill.

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